Black Theology: A Critical Assessment and Annotated Bibliography

Black Theology: A Critical Assessment and Annotated Bibliography

Black Theology: A Critical Assessment and Annotated Bibliography

Black Theology: A Critical Assessment and Annotated Bibliography

Synopsis

Foreword by G.E. Gorman Preface Introduction: A Critical Assessment Annotated Bibliography The Origin and Development of Black Theology Liberation, Feminism, and Marxism Cultural and Global Discourse Index of Names Index of Titles Index of Subjects

Excerpt

During the 1960s, in the midst of the outward progress made by the Civil Rights Movement --and perhaps because of it-- the face of this nation was changed. Much like the sinister vision of William Butler Yeats, some "rough beast, its hour come round at last, slouched toward Bethlehem to be born." In the 1960s, this event was the rise of black power. The term "black power," as we understand it, was first given currency by Adam Clayton Powell, Jr., at a rally in Chicago in May 1965. It was widely publicized and copied after he used the term again in an commencement address at Howard University a year later, on May 29, 1966. The term "black power" was used by Frederick Douglass in the mid-nineteenth century in his essay entitled "The Doom of the Black Power." However, for Douglass, the term referred to the demonic force behind the slave trade and thus had completely negative connotations. Nearly a century later, in 1954, the phrase was used again by the novelist Richard Wright as the title of a book of non-fiction. For Wright, the term referred to the animating force behind the national independence movements on the continent of Africa. Later, in the 1960s, other black champions such as Stokely Carmichael and Roy Inness defined black power as the capacity of black people to exercise their God-given rights as human beings (see 024).

The term "black power" was and remains charged with tremendous emotive energy. It became the rallying cry for black nationalist groups, political radicals, and cultural revolutionaries; as such, it was the hallmark of the break between the black radical movement and the more accomodationist Civil Rights movement. The central intent of the black power movement was the empowerment of black people.

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