Ban the Bomb: A History of SANE, the Committee for a Sane Nuclear Policy

Ban the Bomb: A History of SANE, the Committee for a Sane Nuclear Policy

Ban the Bomb: A History of SANE, the Committee for a Sane Nuclear Policy

Ban the Bomb: A History of SANE, the Committee for a Sane Nuclear Policy

Synopsis

Illustrations Preface Nuclear Pacifism in Cold War America, 1945-1957 Bringing the Voice of Sanity of the People, 1957-1959 Communist Infiltration in the Nuclear Test Ban Movement, 1960 A Portal to a More Rational Future, 1961-1963 Vietnam and the Politics of a "Responsible" Protest, 1963-1973 The Nightmare that Won't Go Away, 1973-1982 Conclusion: SANE and the Revival of the Nuclear Disarmament Movement, 1982-1985 Bibliography Index

Excerpt

The people in the long run are going to do more to promote peace than our government. Indeed, I think that people want peace so much that one of these days government better get out of the way and let them have it.

--Dwight David Eisenhower, 1959

On June 12, 1982, the largest political demonstration in U.S. history took place in New York City where estimated crowds from 700,000 to perhaps a million people jammed the streets of Manhattan and the Great Lawn in Central Park to protest the nuclear arms race. Although Newsweek felt it important to comment that this "gigantic turnout was a remarkable reminder of the extraordinary speed with which anti-nuclear sentiment has swept the world," there is a small group of American citizens who have actively participated against nuclear weapons for over a quarter of a century. Exactly twenty-five years before, in June 1957, twenty-seven prominent citizens met at the Overseas Press Club in New York City and formed the "Provisional Committee to Stop Nuclear Tests." In the fall, the group adopted the name the National Committee for a Sane Nuclear Policy, commonly known as SANE, placed a fullpage advertisement in the New York Times which read "We Are Facing A Danger Unlike Any Danger That Has Ever Existed," and quickly became the largest and most influential nuclear disarmament organization in the United States.

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