Theatre Companies of the World - Vol. 1

Theatre Companies of the World - Vol. 1

Theatre Companies of the World - Vol. 1

Theatre Companies of the World - Vol. 1

Synopsis

"For information in English about outstanding theater companies in most countries, this is likely to be a standard. Highly recommended." Library Journal

Excerpt

Argentina's Comedia Nacional Argentina, Australia's Melbourne Theatre Company, Canada's Stratford Festival, East Germany's Berliner Ensemble, France's La Comédie Française, Great Britain's Royal Shakespeare Company, Indonesia's Giri Harja, Israel's Habima, Italy's Teatro di Eduardo, Korea's National Theatre Company, Nigeria's Ogunde Theatre Company, Poland's Jerzy Grotowski's Laboratory Theatre, the Soviet Union's Moscow Art Theatre, Sweden's Royal Dramatic Theatre, and the United States of America's Guthrie Theater--these are a few of the great theatre companies of the world that represent a proud tradition of excellence in every aspect of performance: producing; directing; acting; scenery, lighting, and sound; choreography, dancing, and mime; costume and makeup. They sponsor classical and modern plays by foreign and national playwrights. As companies, they are distinguished by what Rustom Bharucha calls "an indefinable cohesion, a certain tone and style of acting, a spirit that unites actors, directors, designers, technicians, and crew in a meaningful synthesis" [Anatomy of a Regional Theatre, Theater (Summer 1979), 10-20]. a performance resulting from such collaboration is often so intense that the audience is aware of only one thing--the performance itself.

Not all the troupes included in Theatre Companies of the World represent a concept of theatre companies as it might be defined in the West: a permanent group of actors and actresses, under contract for a specified period each year, who perform a season of plays that includes nonmusical productions. the 1960 Masks, Wole Soyinka's first theatre company formed in the year of Nigerian Independence, consisted of part-time actors from the cities of Lagos and Ibadan. Ketu H. Katrak reports that one group usually rehearsed in a jolting landrover while traveling the hundred miles to meet the other group. There were no regular contracts. Indonesian drama, like much of Southeast Asian drama, is a rich . . .

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