The Life of George Moore

The Life of George Moore

The Life of George Moore

The Life of George Moore

Excerpt

THE OLD MAIL COACH ROAD leading from Dublin to Castlebar enters the county of Mayo a little beyond the hundredth milestone from Dublin. At the hundred and seventh milestone a road on the left crosses stone and bog for a few miles until the flat, reedy shore of Lough Carra comes in sight, the third and smallest of the three lakes--Corrib, Mask and Carra--which stretch in an almost unbroken sheet of water northwards from Galway Bay. Beyond the lake rises the blue ridge of the Partry Mountains. It is a soft wild country which the Welsh invaded in the twelfth century, and then de Burgo and his Normans; and Irish, Welsh and Normans have left the traces of their struggles and their defeats in the ruins of old castles and churches along the shores and on the islands, Castle Carra, Castle Burke, the Abbey of Ballintubber built in 1150 for Roderick O'Connor, last King of Ireland, the cell on Church Island under Partry where Marban, the hermit-poet, made his dwelling in the ninth century. A headland jutting southward into the lake divides it into two arms, and above the eastern arm, on a slope called Muckloon, there stands a square Georgian house of comfortable size with a prospect over numerous wooded islands to the far-off Connemara hills. A thick growth of ivy covers the walls, and from a distance Moore Hall still looks much as it must have looked when George Moore, the Alicante merchant, built it on his return from Spain in 1795; only a nearer view reveals the fact that it is nothing but a burnt-out shell.

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.