Heavenly Mansions: And Other Essays on Architecture

Heavenly Mansions: And Other Essays on Architecture

Heavenly Mansions: And Other Essays on Architecture

Heavenly Mansions: And Other Essays on Architecture

Excerpt

An essay is an attempt, and the ten essays in this book are attempts to illuminate certain widely different aspects of architecture which have interested me. None of the essays is a formal or final treatment of its subject and in some I must confess to trespassing on ground where my passport, as historian and critic, is not exactly valid. I offer no apology for this; architecture, past, present and future, is indivisible and a writer on the subject must pry as best he can equally into Gothic niches and the offices of practising architects. Both have some bearing on the architectural thought of tomorrow.

Some of the essays have been read as papers and a few published as articles. All have been revised and expanded, if not entirely re-written. Essay No. I was read as a Sessional Paper before the RIBA in 1946. Essay Nos. 2, 4, 6, 8 and 10 were delivered as part of a course at Bristol University under the Perry Bequest in 1947. Essay No. 9 was, in substance, read before the Architectural Association in 1941. Essay. No. 7 was read at the Courtauld Institute in 1945 and published in the Architectural Review, whose editor has kindly allowed me to reprint it. Essay No. 3, the longest and the oldest, was awarded the RIBA Essay Medal for 1936 and printed at the time in the Institute's Journal; it is reprinted here with the Institute's permission.

I am indebted to the courtesy of the following for the use of illustrations. To Mr Arthur Gardner for Plate VIII; to the LCC for Plate XXXVI; to the editor of the Builder for Plate XXXIX; to the RIBA and the Trustees of the British Museum and of the Soane Museum for permission to reproduce prints and . . .

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