The Life and Works of Thomas Lupset: With a Critical Text of the Original Treatises and the Letters

The Life and Works of Thomas Lupset: With a Critical Text of the Original Treatises and the Letters

The Life and Works of Thomas Lupset: With a Critical Text of the Original Treatises and the Letters

The Life and Works of Thomas Lupset: With a Critical Text of the Original Treatises and the Letters

Excerpt

No more interesting approach to the cultural history of England during the first thirty years of the sixteenth century can be found than a study of the life of Thomas Lupset. His career embraces almost all the achievements in the development of English humanism in that important period. He was one of the first to study under William Lily after St. Paul's School was established. As a boy he resided for several years with the school's founder, Dean Colet. At Cambridge he aided Erasmus in the preparation of the latter's edition of the New Testament. In Paris he helped to publish two of Linacre's Latin translations of Galen, as well as the second edition of More Utopia. He played a prominent part in the defense of Erasmus' New Testament against the attacks of Edward Lee. He was one of the first professors of Humanity at Oxford. He was intimately acquainted, also, with many other Englishmen who were, or were to become, well known. With Reginald Pole, the future cardinal, he lived for a while in Padua. Richard Pace, s's successor at Paul's, was a close acquaintance. John Leland, the antiquary, was one of his friends. Among his many pupils was probably Nicholas Udall, the scholar and playwright. Another of his students was Edmund Withypoll, later the friend of Gabriel Harvey. Moreover, he was employed on different occasions by Wolsey and Henry VIII. He was, in short, very much a part of his age.

His career, though brief, was essentially similar to that of the typical English scholar of the day, and very admirably illustrates how varied were the opportunities for eminent self-expression that were brought, through Tudor policy, to the gifted sons of middle-class parents. To a far greater extent than ever before, talent came to be regarded as more important than birth. As did so many of his contemporaries--Tunstall and Pace, for instance --Lupset succeeded by his ability alone. Furthermore, his life was an active one because he was a man of learning. A lover of books, he could for this reason render to his king and country valuable services of a practical sort. A scholar, he was, almost necessarily, a man of the world. Also well illustrated by his career is the international nature of early sixteenth-century humanism. Among his . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.