Keats' Reputation in America to 1848

Keats' Reputation in America to 1848

Keats' Reputation in America to 1848

Keats' Reputation in America to 1848

Excerpt

The publisher John Taylor often commented on the slowness with which Keats' poems sold in England, and it is extremely doubtful that many copies of the 1817, 1818, and 1820 volumes made their way to America, although magazines (like the New York Literary and Scientific Repository , October, 1820), following London journals, sometimes announced their publication. Hence it was scarcely to be expected that the compiler of Elegant Extracts of Poetry (Hartford, Connecticut, 1818) should have been able to include selections from them; and while he professes to represent "each of the celebrated living bards in Great-Britain," his romantic poets are limited to Campbell, Byron, Moore, Southey, Wordsworth, Hunt, and Scott. Copies of the 1817 and 1818 poems were sent by Keats to his brother George in Louisville, Kentucky; but as late as April 10, 1824, George wrote to C. W. Dilke that he had "not even the last book that he [John] published," and asked "if it sustained or injured his poetical reputation."

Mr. T. O. Mabbott believes that the obscure young author, Elizabeth Denning, of Poems (New York, 1821) . . .

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