Bravos of the West

Bravos of the West

Bravos of the West

Bravos of the West

Synopsis

Bravos of the West is a panoramic history of the development of the West after the Lewis and Clark expedition. Appearing, exiting, and reappearing in this history are trappers, traders, prospectors, gunslingers, missionaries, soldiers, and scientists. Here they are shown trapping beaver, confronting bears, trading, and discovering natural wonders as they advance ever farther into the wilds. John Myers Myers begins with the struggle for Texas and follows the men and women who came West: the mountain men beyond the mouth of the Yellowstone, the emigrants to Oregon, the fortune hunters to California, the Mormons to Salt Lake, the stagecoaches, express ponies, and steam-engine trains through mountain passes and open country, and the outlaws to all of it. Playing their roles on this huge historical stage are Andrew Jackson, Davy Crockett, Hugh Glass, Jim Bowie, William Ashley, Mike Fink, Jim Bridger, Kit Carson, Thomas Hart Benton, Stephen Austin, Sam Houston, Peg-leg Smith, Mountain Lamb, Marcus and Narcissa Whitman, Jack Swilling, Henry Plummer, Jack Coffee Hays, Deaf Smith, John Charles Fremont, Brigham Young, John Sutter, Sitting Bull, Cynthia Ann Parker, Joaquin Murrieta, and Wild Bill Hickok.

Excerpt

If a bullet fired at or by Andrew Jackson had killed either him or Thomas Hart Benton, or if it had slain the infant John Charles Frémont, in place of doing no harm except to the walls of the room in which he was quartered, the matter of this chronicle would have taken many other turns. That would have been a pity, for in its achieved form, at once so huge and subtly shaped, it hardly seems that it could have been improved upon. Certainly no author's fancy could have made a whole out of parts so various. the story of the Bravos of the West is history's unicorn, if something outsized and hairy to show the half strain of mammoth.

Much has been written about the many who seized and held the eastern moiety of this country; little enough, and that fragmentary, has been published about the few who turned a large but limited nation into one of continent-spanning dimensions. a glance at comparative figures should suffice to give that tribute legs to stand on.

Of the some 3,026,000 square miles contained in the geographically connected United States of America, roughly 875,000 lie east of the Mississippi River. Approximately 940,000 were included in the Louisiana Purchase, once Napoleon's generosity in throwing in more than he could properly sell had been corrected. the remaining balance of more than 1,200,000 was acquired-- the Pacific Northwest having been won by discovery and lost . . .

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