Assessing What Professors Do: An Introduction to Academic Performance Appraisal in Higher Education

Assessing What Professors Do: An Introduction to Academic Performance Appraisal in Higher Education

Assessing What Professors Do: An Introduction to Academic Performance Appraisal in Higher Education

Assessing What Professors Do: An Introduction to Academic Performance Appraisal in Higher Education

Synopsis

This book is a basic treatment of faculty performance appraisal in higher education. It is written for those scholars faced with the need to understand the issues and solutions to the often thorny problems posed by having to judge the performance of their colleagues in teaching, service, research and citizenship. Neophyte administrators, committee members, and those facing evaluation are often perplexed by the range and depth of the questions concerning what constitutes an effective and reasonable performance appraisal system. This book provides answers to the most common of these questions and integrates current thinking from education literature with models of strategic management from business administration.

Excerpt

This book is written for the academician, administrator and anyone else interested in faculty performance appraisal or evaluation in higher education. While there has been a significant amount written concerning the evaluation of faculty performance, there has been little attempt to integrate issues of ethics in the appraisal literature. The fundamental purpose of this book is to examine faculty performance appraisal. However, the authors' approach is to also integrate discussions of ethical and legal obligations into the presentation.

The examination of faculty performance appraisal is a controversial topic. Much of what has been written and much of what is known has come from the perspective of scholars in education. The authors of this book are economists writing from the perspective of economists concerned with education and faculty performance. Rigorous economic models have been avoided to make the text accessible to all who might benefit. Further, the authors are faculty members in a school of business, and the orientation of the book is focused on business and social science programs. This is not to say that the authors support the notion that universities should emulate business practices in personnel or service delivery decisions. In fact, academic decision making should not and cannot be constrained by profit-maximizing goals if educational progress is the goal. However, certain economic and business perspectives provide useful insights for the practice of faculty performance appraisals. As such, it is believed that this book will be a useful guide to novice administrators and/or faculty members faced with the task of helping to create or attempting to survive . . .

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