Brain, Mind, and Behavior: A New Perspective on Human Nature

Brain, Mind, and Behavior: A New Perspective on Human Nature

Brain, Mind, and Behavior: A New Perspective on Human Nature

Brain, Mind, and Behavior: A New Perspective on Human Nature

Synopsis

This is a most unusual book with profound social, political, and philosophical implications that will inform the national debate on intelligence. It combines personality, temperament, and intelligence in a common theory that demonstrates the fundamental psychological and social significance of human differences in brain function. Dr. Robinson goes from cell to psyche in a manner that will appeal to all who wish to know more about the interrelation of brain, mind, and behavior. The book is a well of facts and insights; it provides a sound basis for teaching and a powerful stimulus for research.

Excerpt

The theory of personality over the last fifty years or so has been tied down very much to either highly speculative psychoanalytic "dynamic" accounts or to endlessly repetitive psychometric studies of taxonomy involving correlational analysis and factor analysis. The demonstration in recent years that genetic factors are prominent in producing differences in personality has changed the climate greatly and has made much more acceptable than previously the notion that biological factors are important in the causation of such differences. This is true both on the side of cognitive personality differences (intelligence, special abilities) as on the side of noncognitive personality (temperament, character). The facts of genetic causation are now widely accepted and are supported by many large-scale investigations involving up to fifteen thousand pairs of twins, carried out in many different countries -- from England to Scandinavia, from Australia to the United States.

Clearly, a link is required to connect the genes and chromosomes on the one side with the behavioral differences observed phenotypically on the other. Such mediating links must be found in human physiology, neuroanatomy, hormonal secretions, etc., and much work has been done in recent years to discover these missing links. Studies have used the EEG, averaged evoked potentials, contingent negative variation (CNV), positron emission tomography (PET), brain electrical activity mapping (BEAM) analysis and many other forms of measurement, which now present a . . .

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