American Art Colonies, 1850-1930: A Historical Guide to America's Original Art Colonies and Their Artists

American Art Colonies, 1850-1930: A Historical Guide to America's Original Art Colonies and Their Artists

American Art Colonies, 1850-1930: A Historical Guide to America's Original Art Colonies and Their Artists

American Art Colonies, 1850-1930: A Historical Guide to America's Original Art Colonies and Their Artists

Synopsis

Some of America's most influential artists of the late 19th and early 20th centuries are featured in this guide, along with a concise overview of the colonies in which they worked. These colonies ranged from Carmel-Monterey in California to Gloucester-Rockport in Massachusetts to Taos and Santa Fe in New Mexico. Some of the artists are famous today, such as Georgia O'Keeffe, while others were well known at the time and added to the name recognition of their particular colonies. Scholars, students, and anyone interested in American Art History will find valuable information on how the closeness of colonies can affect and influence artists.

Excerpt

California in 1900 was a plein air haven for artists, enhanced by sunshine, coastal mountains, rocky shorelines and relaxed lifestyle. The Impressionist painters gathered in seaside art colonies at Monterey and Laguna Beach, artistically competing for painted records of stimulating colorful scenery in various stages of light and shadow.

Steve Shipp

Old Lyme, in Connecticut, was a popular place for many artists, especially those who had studied and worked with the French Impressionists and were looking for somewhere in the United States offering similar landscape subjects.

Steve Shipp

During the last half of the nineteenth century and early years of the twentieth century there was a phenomenal growth of American art colonies. This growth has been often discussed in conversation and history books, but there is insufficient published material to fully explain the background of their establishment and their place in American history. A few publications have occasionally provided detailed information on specific colonies (see the bibliography), but none has yet to adequately explore the entire range of America's art colonies. The subject is interesting, but the required research is perhaps too elusive and overwhelming to pursue, as opposed to that of more general subjects such as American Impressionism, American Modernism, and American Realism.

The term "art colony" has become a descriptive but somewhat vague notion in the American language, sometimes referring to a place where artists once gathered and worked, sometimes to a place where the one-time art colony has evolved into a community in which art and artists are vital to the economy, and, more currently, a place where artists and art galleries are concentrated in a par-

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