The Secret of Ulysses: An Analysis of James Joyce's Ulysses

The Secret of Ulysses: An Analysis of James Joyce's Ulysses

The Secret of Ulysses: An Analysis of James Joyce's Ulysses

The Secret of Ulysses: An Analysis of James Joyce's Ulysses

Excerpt

Ulysses is a book many know about but few read. It is studied by sophisticates and scholars, but hardly ever enjoyed. It has remained a riddle which arouses curiosity but not an emotional response. It has become a book about which to write other books. Ulysses was praised by critics as a literary masterpiece written by an acrobat of language endowed with profound erudition and able to blend his experiences into a surprisingly new aesthetic form. One may well ask how a work can be enjoyed aesthetically if the reader is struggling to detect the plot, if he is frustrated while decoding what is said, if he feels badly equipped to understand what the author is saying, if he wonders why the author disregards -- or has to disregard? -- clarity. One may well insist that if the aesthetic structure is not understood as a function of the author's main purpose then the created work cannot be aesthetically evaluated.

My first intent is, therefore, to prepare the reader for the enjoyment of what I believe to be one of the masterpieces, if not the masterpiece, of world literature.

*

I confess this to be an attempt to lure the reader to a contemplation of his personal existential status, with or without help from a psychoanalyst. The aesthetic enjoyment of Ulysses may lead to a full engagement in which the reader gains a new awareness of the required growth, if he desires the riches of life. The reader may discover himself in Bloom and Stephen, and realize that therapeutic, moral, and religious quests are one and the same, although traditionally they are described from different points of view.

So my second intent is to introduce the reader to the exciting adventure exemplified by Bloom and Stephen, hoping he will not shy from the fateful undertaking of gaining selfexperience of what has been called the 'mysteries.' This is my intent as a psychoanalyst engaged in therapy.

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.