Higher Education Administration: A Guide to Legal, Ethical, and Practical Issues

Higher Education Administration: A Guide to Legal, Ethical, and Practical Issues

Higher Education Administration: A Guide to Legal, Ethical, and Practical Issues

Higher Education Administration: A Guide to Legal, Ethical, and Practical Issues

Synopsis

In higher education, decisions are made against a complex and often conflicting backdrop of applicable law, ethical questions, and practical considerations. Goonen and Blechman assist academic administrators by providing an overview of the legal parameters, ethical questions, and practical suggestions applicable to the most frequently encountered areas of academic decision making.

Excerpt

After having worked together in our roles as academic vice president of a university and legal counsel to a university, we were acutely aware of the formidable decision-making tasks facing the academic administrator. Not only do decisions made for the university have to meet the requirements of law, but they also have to mirror the institution's values and meet the practical requirements of running a viable and stable educational enterprise.

There are a myriad of books discussing the requirements of law and how it affects academic administration. However, we found a dearth of resources on the ethical questions that arise in academic decision making and the practical considerations that impact the legal and ethical operation of the educational institution. What was needed, we decided, was a resource that raised some of the ethical issues and addressed some of the practical issues while highlighting the need for a tri-faceted approach to decisions in the academic arena. This book attempts to address certainly not all but many of the major decisions that an academic administrator is faced with on a daily basis. We decided to limit its scope to academic affairs because including student affairs would have resulted in another voluminous undertaking. We acknowledge, however, that an academic administrator may be involved in a broader spectrum of issues, and the authors would advise that a similar tri-faceted approach be employed with decisions in the student affairs realm.

The scope of decision making in academic administration revolves around relationships with faculty and students -- and with others, to a lesser extent. This . . .

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