The Education of African-Americans

The Education of African-Americans

The Education of African-Americans

The Education of African-Americans

Synopsis

This volume takes a comprehensive look at the education of African-Americans, specifically early childhood through postsecondary education, and relevant public policy issues since 1940. The list of contributors to the study includes white and black scholars who, by focusing on the known status of the education of African-Americans to date and the additional factors that need to be considered in order to develop appropriate educational strategies, evaluate current programs and suggest ways to improve public policy. Topics ranging from the counseling of minority children to the continuing struggle with racial violence on campus demonstrate the broad scope of this volume.

Excerpt

In spring 1987 the William Monroe Trotter Institute for the Study of Black Culture at the University of Massachusetts at Boston initiated a national project, The Assessment of the Status of African-Americans. The project included study groups on six topics: employment, income, and occupations; political participation and administration of justice; social and cultural change and continuity; health status and medical care; family; and education. The study group on education included: Robert A. Dentler of the University of Massachusetts at Boston; Robert C. Johnson of St. Cloud State University; Meyer Weinberg of the University of Massachusetts at Amherst; and Charles V. Willie of Harvard and Antoine M. Garibaldi of Xavier University in Louisiana, who served as chair and vice-chair, respectively.

The project was developed to reflect upon the status of African- Americans since 1940 in each of the topical areas in anticipation of the results and analyses of the National Research Council's (NRC) Study Committee on the Status of Black Americans. The Trotter Institute and the more than 60 scholars who agreed to participate in the assessment project recognized that the NRC study would not only have significant implications for African-Americans but would also directly affect public policy. Thus, it was imperative that groups be formed prior to the release of the NRC study so that study group recommendations could stand on their own merits.

The education study group met in late May 1987 and drafted an agenda of significant educational issues ranging from early childhood education programs through postsecondary education public policy . . .

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