Poison Gas: The Myths Versus Reality

Poison Gas: The Myths Versus Reality

Poison Gas: The Myths Versus Reality

Poison Gas: The Myths Versus Reality

Synopsis

The threat of poison gas, and other related biological warfare agents, holds our society hostage to the possible actions of terrorist groups or rogue states. This study hopes to convince policymakers and the general public that the bad reputation that surrounds the use of gas is largely the result of propaganda, misinformation, and oft-repeated half-truths. With proper precautions and discipline, neither the military nor society need fear gas as a weapon of mass destruction, wielded by dictators and cowards who utilize the loopholes in international agreements and flaunt world opinion. While not advocating the use of toxic gas in warfare, the author argues that education and common sense are the most effective tools to combat the gases that remain in arsenals around the world.

Excerpt

The purpose of this treatise is to provide the lay reader, not the scholar, with an appreciation of the reality of poison gas. It does so by reviewing the myths and half-truths that have grown up about gas over the last 80-plus years and have been perpetuated by uninformed political figures, the press, university professors and others with some personal bias against gas.

Its purpose is not, however, to advocate the use of poison or any other gas in warfare. Gas, as used just prior to World War II and in the last two decades in Afghanistan, the Middle East and elsewhere, is the weapon of cowards. There are still cowards in the world who masquerade under the guise of a greater cause to commit terrorist acts like using gas as a threat to the Free World.

One hopes that this tutorial on the nature of gas will provide the reading public with knowledge it has lacked. So informed, the reader will be ready to deal with the subject of poison gas in a rational manner. Suffice it to say, had anyone read this before the summer of 1998 and the CNN-Time fantasy about American use of nerve gas in Laos in 1970, they would never have lent any credence to it.

The entire Free World, despite its intellectual sophistication, is being held hostage by fear. This fear of the unknown has proliferated for the past 80 years through propaganda, unsound pronouncements of world leaders and misleading labels compounded by a public press that has neglected its own mandate to seek out and tell the truth. The culprit is the notion of gas as a weapon.

Gas has been exaggerated as a weapon by its endowment with a host of half-accurate, but pejorative, descriptions and adjectives. All of these . . .

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