Recruitment, Retention, and Employee Relations: Field-Tested Strategies for the '90s

Recruitment, Retention, and Employee Relations: Field-Tested Strategies for the '90s

Recruitment, Retention, and Employee Relations: Field-Tested Strategies for the '90s

Recruitment, Retention, and Employee Relations: Field-Tested Strategies for the '90s

Synopsis

This book documents what some of the world's most successful and innovative companies are doing to improve their recruitment, retention and employee relations. The book is designed to make Human Resources a competitive weapon. During these times of labor shortages and increased dependence on front-line people to perform their task with dependability and zeal, it is essential to enhance our ability to recruit, retain and improve employee relations. World-class companies like Merck, Hewlett-Packard, General Electric, Federal Express, Motorola, Cypress and PepsiCo share their techniques.

Excerpt

PepsiCo's chief executive, Wayne Calloway, in discussing all the changes the corporation had made in recent years, said, "Nothing focuses the mind better than the constant sight of a competitor who wants to wipe you off the maps" (Sellers 1991, 63). As a result of this attitude, PepsiCo not only reacts to its competitor's every move but also frequently revamps operations, marketing, and manufacturing, even when things look OK. As Calloway says, "In today's economy, if it ain't broke, you might as well break it yourself because it soon will be" (63).

Acceptance of change has led to much of PepsiCo's success. Today the need for change is self-evident. In many cases, both domestic and foreign competitors are acting as the agents of change. Consider the fact that a decade ago 94 percent of the computers bought in the United States were made in the United States; in 1990 that figure was down to 66 percent. Beyond those figures is the fact that computers today are often hollowed out and full of Asian parts.

Even some made-in-America products are not what they seem. Some of these products are assembled by $6-a-day maquiladora (American owned and operated company inside Mexico) employees just inside Mexico. Even 300,000 American flags were imported from Taiwan and other foreign countries (Faltermayer 1990).

Foreign competition is tough and getting tougher. According to Fortune magazine, America has lost ground to foreign imports in both high technology and other industries. Everyone already knows about the trouble U.S. automakers are having, but many others are being challenged.

U.S. high technology's market share of telephone equipment dropped . . .

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