Labor Relations Law in State and Local Government

Labor Relations Law in State and Local Government

Labor Relations Law in State and Local Government

Labor Relations Law in State and Local Government

Synopsis

Here is a practical guide to labor-management relations law in state government. The authors provide general coverage of the law concerning employee rights, union organizing, scope of bargaining, good-faith negotiations, impasse procedures, and contract administration. Case law and examples are drawn from virtually every jurisdiction in the United States. Appendices include an annotated bibliography of the literature concerning state and local labor law and an example statute.

Excerpt

Labor law in the public sector is different from that found in the private sector. In the private sector there are only two major bodies of law that apply: the Railway Labor Act, which applies to the nation's railroads and airlines, and the Taft-Hartley Act, which applies to the remainder of the private sector that has a substantial effect on interstate commerce. The presentation and analysis of private sector labor law is therefore relatively easy.

Federal sector labor law has grown out of several executive orders. Congress passed the 1978 Civil Service Reform Act to replace the federal executive orders and establish statutory enabling law. The labor law in the federal sector recognizes a significant body of federal statutes, rules, and regulations, thereby making the legal landscape more complex than private sector law.

Labor law governing labor--management relations for state and local government is far different from either private or federal sector labor laws. Each state is responsible for its own public policy towards public employee unions. To date, more than four dozen state labor laws are in force. There are also dozens of city and local ordinances governing labor management relations. To . . .

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