Expanding the Frontiers: Superpower Intervention in the Cold War

Expanding the Frontiers: Superpower Intervention in the Cold War

Expanding the Frontiers: Superpower Intervention in the Cold War

Expanding the Frontiers: Superpower Intervention in the Cold War

Synopsis

This study examines the history of superpower intervention in domestic conflicts around the world during the Cold War era. This unique analysis goes beyond a reexamination of dramatic instances of American and Soviet intervention to a combination of aggregate event data methodology and historical case studies. General patterns in the nature of superpower intervention throughout four decades are highlighted and U.S.-Soviet behavior is carefully and consistently compared across the entire period of the Cold War.

Excerpt

The extraordinary events of the winter of 1991-1992 -- the breakup of the Soviet Union, the disintegration of the Communist party, and the historic declaration by George Bush of the United States and Boris Yeltsin of the Republic of Russia in February of 1992 that the Cold War had ended -- served as a dramatic conclusion to & events of this book. As this book went to press the future was unclear for the former Soviet Union, which is now divided into three Baltic republics, the Republic of Georgia (currently in a state of civil war), and a loose confederation of republics known as the Commonwealth of Independent States. Having prepared this manuscript prior to these events, I refer mostly to the Soviet Union in the present tense, since I assumed that this nation-state would continue to exist. Readers are asked to bear in mind this time lag and the fact that no one, not even the main actors themselves, could keep up with the rapidly unfolding events.

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