Turkey: The Challenge of a New Role

Turkey: The Challenge of a New Role

Turkey: The Challenge of a New Role

Turkey: The Challenge of a New Role

Synopsis

This book examines Turkey's position in the world at the end of the Cold War. An account of Turkey's political history, society, and economy helps determine what degree of credence to attach to the claim that Turkey is an island of stability in a troubled area extending from the borders of the European Union to China. The author describes Turkey's foreign relations with the West, in general, and the European Union, in particular, and also with its Middle Eastern neighbors, Greece and the ex-communist countries, including the Turkic republics of the former Soviet Union. The emphasis is on Turkey's ability to support Western efforts to bring political stability to the region and to enter into partnership with Western economic enterprise.

Excerpt

To say that Andrew Mango Turkey: The Challenge of a New Role provides a most welcome and timely addition to the nearly nonexistent monographic treatment of contemporary Turkey would be a gross understatement. His insightful analysis reflects both a close familiarity with and appreciation for the problems facing this key country.

Turkey is located in a neighborhood that by any standards must be termed marginal and in the wake of the collapse of the Soviet Union and the Warsaw Pact could well become a slum. Turkey's neighbors have traditionally included Iran, Iraq, Syria, Cyprus, Greece, Bulgaria, Romania, and the USSR; to this crowded list the USSR's collapse has added the Russian Republic, Moldova, Ukraine, Georgia, Armenia, and Azerbaijan.

Turkey is literally surrounded by instability. Russia, whose future is still to be determined, has recently begun exhibiting nationalist tendencies that do not bode well for Turkey. Georgia is still suffering the aftershocks of a particularly brutal civil war, and Armenia and Azerbaijan show little sign of resolving their five-year ethnic dispute over Nagorno-Karabakh. Iran, whose own future course is far from clear, spares no expense in exporting terrorism and its own brand of Islamic fundamentalism to neighbor-

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