Global Perspectives on Organizational Conflict

Global Perspectives on Organizational Conflict

Global Perspectives on Organizational Conflict

Global Perspectives on Organizational Conflict

Synopsis

This edited collection examines organizational conflict and how it is handled in seven different countries (and cultures) around the globe: France, Japan, the Netherlands, Norway, South Africa, Spain, and Turkey. Experts on each country discuss how various social, cultural, and economic forces affect conflict management; how managerial styles differ with regard to organizational and interpersonal conflict management; alternative dispute mechanisms available in each country for the resolution of conflict; and how general managerial effectiveness can be improved with respect to organizational conflict.

Excerpt

J○+⃓rn Kjell Rognes

In this chapter we explore the nature of conflict-management and negotiation behavior in Norway. the purpose is to examine how institutional and cultural factors affect the use of different conflict-management procedures and managerial behavior in negotiation processes. This chapter presents an explorative discussion of comparative conflict-management analysis with a focus on Norway. in doing so we draw upon anthropological literature on Norway, institutional sociology, and on my own work as a researcher and consultant in conflict management. Given the explorative nature of this analysis, conclusions are presented as testable propositions and not as confirmed results.

It is now widely accepted that a moderate amount of conflict is both necessary and unavoidable in organized systems (Rahim, 1992). the effect of conflict on individuals and organizations depends on how the conflicts are managed (Brett & Rognes, 1986). Conflict researchers have identified a variety of conflict-management procedures and behavioral styles used in conflict situations, and they have also made normative recommendations for how to handle conflict most constructively (Fisher & Ury, 1981; Tjosvold, 1989). But the conflict-management literature is predominantly American, and we have little knowledge about how actual and preferred ways of handling conflicts vary across nations. There is little knowledge about the applicability of American theories in other national contexts. This is unfortunate for two major reasons. First, conflict and conflict management are sensitive issues in most nations, and we need relevant theoretical frameworks for understanding the role of conflict in different cultures. Second, since multinational companies have subsidiaries in many countries, and since international negotiations are gaining importance for . . .

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