Citizen Espionage: Studies in Trust and Betrayal

Citizen Espionage: Studies in Trust and Betrayal

Citizen Espionage: Studies in Trust and Betrayal

Citizen Espionage: Studies in Trust and Betrayal

Synopsis

This is the first work to examine the phenomena of citizen espionage from the point of view of trust betrayal. Here is an effort to illuminate the social, political, and psychological conditions that influence trusted American citizens to spy against their country. The volume combines historical inquiry, sociological studies, psychological insights, and criminological analysis. It is especially timely when many nations, friend and foe alike, have instituted programs to obtain trade secrets and classified technology from American military and industrial sources.

Excerpt

Save for the Introduction, the eight chapters that follow are edited versions of a colloquium series sponsored by the Defense Personnel Security Research Center. The center was established in 1986 in the wake of the "Year of the Spy." It was in 1985 that the nation learned of damage to the national security as a result of the activities of citizen spies. A government commission was organized to inquire into the effectiveness of security programs. Among the commission's recommendations was the establishment of a research center to study, among other things, the phenomenon of citizen espionage. The research would presumably throw light on the phenomenon and also point the way to improvement in the policies and the practices of government agencies charged with guarding the nation's secrets.

Espionage has a long history. As long as a nation makes use of secrets in its preparation for defense, diplomacy, and governance, other nations will try to penetrate security barriers to have access to such secrets. For the past fifty years or more, the U.S. government tried to keep military and diplomatic information from falling into the hands of Soviet intelligence agents. The dissolution of the Soviet Union has eliminated one of the most persistent collectors of strategic information and technology. The need for vigilance and security, however, has not diminished. In a world driven by competition for limited resources, nations will continue to employ secret agents and will try to recruit citizens who are custodians of secrets to participate in espionage against their country.

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.