The Mess in Washington: Manpower Mobilization in World War II

The Mess in Washington: Manpower Mobilization in World War II

The Mess in Washington: Manpower Mobilization in World War II

The Mess in Washington: Manpower Mobilization in World War II

Synopsis

"A clearly written and thoroughly researched scholarly effort on what may seem to be a narrowly specialized aspect of the Second World War. But Flynn is well aware-- and a reader quickly learns--that the subject of manpower mobilization affords not simply an instructive view of backstairs politics in the Roosevelt administration, but a confrontation with some of the most fundamental and difficult questions for a democratic nation.... Highly recommended for all college and university libraries." - Choice

Excerpt

Recruiting and training labor were the two main tasks which occupied McNutt and the wmc throughout the war. Using every device at his disposal, and a few which went beyond his mandate, McNutt sought labor for the war machine. As he pursued his objective his methods became more and more coercive. Despite his attempts to cover this coercion with semantic quibbling, McNutt seemed to be pushing regimentation without the benefit of legislation. If he failed, despite the gyrations, his political future seemed bleak and the economy of the United States might fall under the control of the military.

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In fulfilling his primary duty McNutt depended upon the United States Employment Service (USES). Originally a state-controlled operation with only cursory federal supervision, the uses was federalized by Roosevelt in December 1941. the entire operation soon came under McNutt's control, despite the objections and fears of southern governors at this alleged infringement of states' rights. McNutt now had at his disposal a nationwide system of labor registration with 1,500 full-time employees and 3,000 part-time workers, all of whom had experience in job analysis and knew local labor needs. He called the local uses office the "corner grocery of the . . .

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