The Treaties of the War of the Spanish Succession: An Historical and Critical Dictionary

The Treaties of the War of the Spanish Succession: An Historical and Critical Dictionary

The Treaties of the War of the Spanish Succession: An Historical and Critical Dictionary

The Treaties of the War of the Spanish Succession: An Historical and Critical Dictionary

Synopsis

From 1702 to 1714, the War of the Spanish Succession affected most of Europe and significant parts of the New World, with battles ranging from the Hungarian plains to the harbors of Rio de Janeiro. The death of the last Hapsburg King of Spain unleashed a struggle for his empire, and the provisions of the final treaties set the boundaries of Europe until the French Revolution. This book includes entries on the individuals who determined the course of the war, who played diplomatic, economic, or military roles, as well as on pivotal battles influencing the outcome, and it examines the provisions of the final treaties in detail.

Excerpt

Acadia , see canada

Act of Union of 1707 , see the union of england and SCOT- land

Acts of renunciation of anne of austria and maria THE- resa. Unlike France, which was governed by the Salic Law, females had the right to inherit the Spanish crown. By the custom of patrilineal succession, when male lines died out, female lines succeeded, beginning with that of the eldest female. the Habsburg dynasty had acquired Spain by marriage with the female line. in 1611, when Marie de'Medici negotiated the marriage of her daughter Elizabeth to Philip iv and of her son Louis xiii to the Spanish princess Anne of Austria, the eldest daughter of Philip iii, the Spanish required Anne to renounce her rights of succession to the throne, whereas Elizabeth was required to make no such renunciation. the marriage contracts, signed in August 1612, specified that each princess would receive a dowry of 500,000 écus, but the dowry would not be paid unless the marriage failed to occur. the ceremony did not take place until 1615, when the brides were older. Anne formally renounced her right of succession at Burgos on 16 October, two days before her proxy marriage to Louis xiii. the renunciation was duly registered by the Parlement of Paris and confirmed in 1618 by the Cortes in accordance with the code of Alfonso X, which required such approval of any change in succession.

Anne's renunciation served as a precedent at the marriage of Philip IV's eldest daughter, Maria Theresa, to Louis xiv, although the latter renunciation was neither as complete nor as faithfully confirmed. No mention was made of any renunciation in preliminary talks, but when Mazarin met with Luis de Haro at the Franco-Spanish border in 1659, Haro insisted that the tradition be followed. At first Mazarin demurred. (The French later claimed that Haro admitted the renunciation was pro forma, and if Philip iv died without male offspring, no . . .

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