Will of the People: Original Democracy in Non-Western Societies

Will of the People: Original Democracy in Non-Western Societies

Will of the People: Original Democracy in Non-Western Societies

Will of the People: Original Democracy in Non-Western Societies

Synopsis

Preface Introduction Democracy and Despotism: Chicken and Egg? Marx and Toynbee vs. "The Cake of Custom" Mesopotamia: Earliest Formal Democracy India: The Spirit of Licchavis The Stubborn Village The Panchayat: Gandhi vs. Britain Varna and Pygmalion Confucius said...? The Hills are Alive The Adat--Durable Cake Stone Age Legislatures The Consesual Islands Iroquois--The First American Republic The Tribes: Proving Jefferson Right Aztecs: Mexican Schizophrenia Incan Empire: The Democratic Fringe Bantu Assembly: Original South African Democracy One-Party Systems: Un-African Activity Semitic Pluralism Korea and Japan--The "Improbable Democracies?" Index

Excerpt

Democratic roots, and the nurturing of freedom in traditional, developing societies is Raul Manglapus's theme.

In his active life--a mixture of idealism and pragmatic political service--he has experienced the broad possibilities of freedom and the utter cruelty and degradation of tyranny. Since World War II interrupted his studies, Manglapus has been near the center of the action in the Pacific basin. But his concern has always included, as well, the aspirations of those struggling for the freedom of other lands in Africa, Eastern Europe, Latin America, and the mainland of Asia. By the time this volume appears, the author may once again have been elected a Senator in the restored democracy of the Philippines.

We first met shortly after he went into self-imposed exile following the declaration of martial law in 1972. From that moment Manglapus sought ways to resist the Marcos regime, restore democratic institutions, and simultaneously assist Yugoslavs, Cubans, Koreans, Taiwanese, and others fighting similar tyrannies. He became president of a group of freedom- inspired activists who came from the broad center of the political spectrum. They called themselves the Democracy International. Freedom House was pleased to assist at its birth.

This book reflects a similar objective: to demonstrate that there are indigenous roots of democracy in many traditional, developing societies; and that intellectual and political leaders . . .

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