Ambassadors in Foreign Policy: The Influence of Individuals on U.S.-Latin American Policy

Ambassadors in Foreign Policy: The Influence of Individuals on U.S.-Latin American Policy

Ambassadors in Foreign Policy: The Influence of Individuals on U.S.-Latin American Policy

Ambassadors in Foreign Policy: The Influence of Individuals on U.S.-Latin American Policy

Synopsis

Introduction by Albert P. Vannucci The Ambassador Simpatico: Dwight Morrow in Mexico by Richard Melzer In Defense of Hegemony: Sumner Welles and the Cuban Revolution of 1933 by Louis Perez Elected by Providence: Spruille Braden in Argentina in 1945 by Albert P. Vannucci Adolf Berle in Brazil: 1945-46 by C. Neale Ronning Lincoln Gordon and Brazil's Military Counterrevolution by Jan Knippers Black In the Years of Salvador Allende by Nathaniel Davis Ambassadors in Foreign Policy by C. Neale Ronning & Albert P. Vannucci Bibliography. Index. About the Editors and Contributors

Excerpt

Albert P. Vannucci

In our age of mass politics, it is popular to believe that collectivities, not individuals, determine political actions. Government bureaucracies, multinational corporations, and the masses are often viewed as the main forces that shape political life. . . . The age of mass politics has hidden heroes, namely the manipulative elite who are disguised and buried behind the bureaucracies, propaganda, and collectivist political theories.

Individuals are the cutting edge of world politics. Nation-States and historical conditions present human beings with opportunities and limitations. But individual willpower and foreign policy decisions make a critical contribution to the outcome and direction of events. Man is conditioned, but at times he can also become a condition.

Robert A. Isaak, Individuals and World Politics

The role of individuals inU. S. foreign policy seems to be given either central importance (as in biographies and psychohistories) or minimal attention (as in systems theories, "realist" analysis, or studies of organizations). Moreover, the individuals who do receive attention are virtually always presidents or secretaries of state or defense. And while the field is rich in studies of institutions such as the State Department, it is practically devoid of any assessment of individuals qua individuals at any level below that of secretary.

This study proposes to address that gap. It is an examination of six individuals who served as U.S. ambassador to an important Latin American country at a particularly determinative time. The individuals were both career Foreign Service officers and political appointees; the countries are of varying size; and the studies span more than 60 years. The criterion for . . .

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