International Law of Take-Overs and Mergers: Southern Europe, Africa, and the Middle East

International Law of Take-Overs and Mergers: Southern Europe, Africa, and the Middle East

International Law of Take-Overs and Mergers: Southern Europe, Africa, and the Middle East

International Law of Take-Overs and Mergers: Southern Europe, Africa, and the Middle East

Synopsis

Preface Part I: Southern Europe Austria Cyprus Greece Italy Spain Switzerland Part II: Africa French Africa Ghana Malawi Nigeria South Africa Tanzania Zambia Zimbabwe Part III: The Middle East An Overview of the Middle East Bahrain Iraq Israel Oman Quatar Saudi Arabia Turkey United Arab Emirates Selected References General Index Index of Cases

Excerpt

This volume is the last of a four-volume set that will cover the regulation of take-overs and mergers in nearly every country in which there exists some control of take-overs and mergers. This volume, Volume IV, covers southern Europe, the Middle East, and Africa. Other volumes cover Australia, New Zealand, and Asia (Volume I), the Americas (Volume II), and Northern Europe (Volume III). In most of the countries included in this volume, there is little take-over regulation, and the law consists merely of merger rules. However, to this have been added rules as to foreign company participation, insider trading, and labor and antitrust legislation.

It is hoped that these volumes will be of benefit to lawyers and others concerned with take-overs and mergers in a particular country. However, one of the main purposes of describing each country's regulation separately is to facilitate cooperation between companies of different countries by way of take-over and merger. For example, transnational companies wishing to operate in a foreign country are often deterred because of ignorance of a country's commercial laws regarding companies. If corporate cooperation is sought, the foreign company may hesitate to enter arrangements because of a lack of understanding of the domestic country's take-over and merger rules. This would be the case particularly if there is no translation or explanation of regulations in the relevant country. Therefore, this work is not so much an analysis of the phenomenon of take-overs and mergers, or the optimal type of regulation, as it is a detailed description of regulations in each country. To the writer's knowledge, this type of work, in this field of knowledge, has not been attempted.

The writing of this volume has entailed a substantial amount of private translation of Spanish, German, Italian, Greek, Turkish, Israeli, and Arab materials of which there is no official translation. For this a private Australian translation service in Brisbane, the Consulting Linguists' Pool, was used. Translations . . .

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