Morality in Accounting

Morality in Accounting

Morality in Accounting

Morality in Accounting

Synopsis

Timely and reliable accounting information is essential. Accounting data and their interpretation must be above suspicion, and to be sure of that, corporations and other users of accounting information must be certain that accountants subscribe to and practice a morality set to high standards. What these standards are, and how they are deficient, distorted, and sometimes even fallacious, are themes explored here. Riahi-Belkaoui leads readers through the complexities of five aspects of accounting morality: fairness, ethics, honesty, social responsibility, and truth. Professionals, scholars, and students are here provided with a clear, pragmatic understanding of what morality in accounting is, or should be, and new reasons to appreciate its essentiality.

Excerpt

The accounting profession is involved in the production and/or the verification of accounting information, deemed vital to users' decision making and to an efficient working of capital markets and national economies. The complete reliance on the resulting accounting information derives from the belief held by the general public about the high moral standards used by accountants in the accomplishment of their duties. Therefore morality in accounting is the crucial factor that helps accounting professionals maintain their high and prestigious occupations and their perceived high level of integrity. This book examines morality in accounting by exploring the conventional view about the facets of this morality as well as the deficiencies, distortions, and even fallacies that still affect some of these facets. To accomplish this task this book covers, in six chapters, five aspects of morality in accounting: (1) fairness, (2) ethics (with issues and cases), (3) honesty, (4) social responsibility, and (5) truth. A good appreciation of the morality issues in accounting is instrumental to a better use and reliance on accountants and accounting data.

The book should be of interest to practitioners, educators, and public policy officials with interest in the general issues of morality in accounting, as well as graduate and undergraduate students in accounting ethics and public- interest accounting courses.

Many people helped in the development of this book. Eric Valentine and Katie Chase of Quorum Books are true professionals and have my deepest gratitude. My thanks go to the individuals and organizations that gave me permission to reprint their excellent material as well as to University of Illinois at Chicago students Kalliopi Karabatsos, Latonja L. Brown, and Catherine Serra for their capable assistance.

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.