Political Communication in America

Political Communication in America

Political Communication in America

Political Communication in America

Synopsis

Denton and Woodward provide a newly updated revision of their classic in political communication. This pioneering text provides a systematic and comprehensive analysis of the role and function of communication in American politics.

Excerpt

Humans are, according to Aristotle Politics, "political beings," and "he who is without a polis, by reason of his own nature and not of some accident, is either a poor sort of being [a beast] or a being higher than man [a god]" (Aristotle 1970, 5). And because nature makes nothing in vain, Aristotle continues, a human "alone of the animals is furnished with the faculty of language" (6). Thus, it was recognized over 2,000 years ago that politics and communication go hand in hand because they are essential parts of human nature. Both fields claim the subject matter of other fields as part of their own content. Nearly every topic that is fit for comment by someone contains the seeds for political and communication analysis. Neither field, of course, can claim an area of interest that is exclusively its own. Each necessarily crosses the boundaries and invades terrain with more neatly defined borders. Advances in medical technology, for example, can be praised or blamed by how they are described. And such descriptions usually have a significant impact on the discussions of the proper role of the state in the control of new technologies. The communication analyst is always a guest (if not an intruder) on someone else's turf. But communication is fundamental to all other fields of inquiry. What we know about events is always revealed first through the communicator's skill and art.

The focus of this edition has not substantively changed from that of previous ones. It concerns the roles and functions of communication in U.S. politics and not on the "politics of communication." In describing the processes common to "political communication," the priorities of the writers would be better reflected if the two terms were reversed. This volume is first about the possibilities and problems inherent to public . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.