Connecting Links: The British and American Woman Suffrage Movements, 1900-1914

Connecting Links: The British and American Woman Suffrage Movements, 1900-1914

Connecting Links: The British and American Woman Suffrage Movements, 1900-1914

Connecting Links: The British and American Woman Suffrage Movements, 1900-1914

Synopsis

Between 1900 and 1914, the British and American suffrage movements were characterized by interaction among suffragists, their organizations, and their publications on a much broader scale than has been generally recognized or acknowledged. Harrison isolates and examines the various connecting links ranging from personal relationships to the emphasis on a common cause. Women participated in one another's organizations and activities, including speaking tours and visits, and each group used the experience of the other to stimulate its own progress. In addition to the prominent figures of the day, Harrison includes information about lesser-known suffragists whose names and actions have been largely lost to history.

Excerpt

Connecting links between suffragists, their organizations, and their publications characterized the British and American woman suffrage movements between 1900 and 1914. Certain bonds and parallels are familiar to those acquainted with the suffrage campaign. the most frequently emphasized connection involves Alice Paul and Lucy Burns who are often cited for attempting to duplicate their British experiences in the United States. the copying of British tactics, especially by their Congressional Union/National Woman's Party, is often mentioned. Another well-known comparison is that both the British and American movements had an older "constitutional wing," as well as a newer militant wing. After alluding to these links and similarities, most suffrage studies focus on suffrage in either Great Britain or the United States.

The major thesis of this book is that an extensive interaction, on a much broader scale than is generally acknowledged or recognized, took place between the British and American suffrage movements between 1900 and 1914. During these years, extensive correspondence, visits, and speaking tours took place between women involved in the two movements. Personal relationships developed that affected the course of both suffrage campaigns. Tactics and strategies were borrowed from the other country, though much of this interchange tended to be one way. Ongoing and lengthy coverage in the suffrage newspapers in both countries reported the interaction and kept participants and observers aware of the common goals of the two movements. An international suffrage organization, in which prominent suffragists of both countries participated, further connected the two movements. This extensive interaction influenced the suffrage movements in both countries, although from 1906 on, the American movement was more affected by the British movement than was the reverse.

This book focuses on isolating and analyzing the connecting links and interaction between the British and American suffrage movements from 1900 to 1914. Seven areas are emphasized and evaluated: (1) personal relationships . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.