Turbulence in the Pacific: Japanese-U.S. Relations during World War I

Turbulence in the Pacific: Japanese-U.S. Relations during World War I

Turbulence in the Pacific: Japanese-U.S. Relations during World War I

Turbulence in the Pacific: Japanese-U.S. Relations during World War I

Synopsis

Although events in East Asia were a sideshow in the great drama of the First World War, what happened there shattered the accord between Japan and the United States. This book pursues the two-fold question of how and why U.S.-Japanese tensions developed into antagonism during the war by inquiring into the historical sources of both sides. Kawamura explains this complex phenomenon by looking at various factors: conflicts of national interests--geopolitical and economic; perceptual problems such as miscommunication, miscalculation, and mistrust; and, most important of all, incompatible approaches to foreign policy. America's universalism and the unilateralism inherent in Wilsonian idealistic internationalism clashed with Japan's particularistic regionalism and the pluralism that derived from its strong sense of racial identity and anti-Western nationalistic sentiments.

Excerpt

This series promotes historical scholarship that is genuinely international in subject matter and approach, as well as multi-archival in methodology. The series fosters publication of monographs and edited volumes which focus on a wide range of topics in the history of international relations. These include studies of the political, military, and diplomatic relations among sovereign states, international economic history, the history of international law, and the role played by "non-state actors" in world affairs. The main focus of the series is the impact of internal political, social, and cultural developments on the formulation of foreign policies and interstate relations. But it also focuses on the effects of international events on the internal affairs of national societies.

In addition to international historians, within the disciplines of International Relations and Political Science there is a corps of scholars who are deeply committed to a historical approach to their fields. These scholars locate their research in a classical tradition of intellectual inquiry that examines the historical antecedents of international conflict and cooperation in order to better explain contemporary affairs. The research and teaching of these scholars suggest that the meaning of political, cultural, social, and economic events is most readily and richly revealed by historically informed study. These scholars pay particular attention to the historical genesis of the principles and practices that shape relations between and among peoples and states. What these scholars have in common is a commitment to moving beyond the confines of a particular society to explore the important connections between that society and the outside world.

Cathal J. Nolan,William R. Keylor, and Erik Goldstein . . .

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