From the Normandy Beaches to the Baltic Sea: The Northwest Europe Campaign, 1944-1945

From the Normandy Beaches to the Baltic Sea: The Northwest Europe Campaign, 1944-1945

From the Normandy Beaches to the Baltic Sea: The Northwest Europe Campaign, 1944-1945

From the Normandy Beaches to the Baltic Sea: The Northwest Europe Campaign, 1944-1945

Synopsis

A brief, yet complete history of the Allied campaign for the liberation of Europe from the Normandy invasion to the surrender of Germany, this study describes not only what happened, but why it happened. While an enormous amount has been written about this campaign, most of it focuses upon a single army or an individual battle. This book stresses a true inter-Allied and all arms approach with a balance of both strategy and tactics; accounts of efforts by land, sea, and air forces; as well as the strong influence of logistics. Levine deals extensively with the German side, particularly morale issues, and he includes the role played by Canadian forces--a topic usually neglected in American accounts.

Excerpt

So many books have been written about Eisenhower's campaign in 1944-1945 that an additional one, at this late date, probably requires explanation. This book is the result of the realization that there is a strange gap in the vast (if uneven) literature about this last phase of the war against Nazi Germany. There is no serious study, and certainly no up-to-date study of manageable size, that covers the entire campaign and the operations of all the Allied armies. in fact, there seems to be no overall study of any size that is truly "Allied" in approach. Chester Wilmot's The Struggle for Europe and Russell Weigley Eisenhower's Lieutenants are magnificent works--and the present book could not have been written without them (or the many fine official histories of the war); but the former is decidedly British in orientation, while Weigley never pretends to be dealing with anything but the American Army.

A "national" approach to the liberation of Europe is simply inadequate. One result is that many people in the United States are surprised to learn that half, or more, of the fighting in Normandy was done by the British and Canadians, while the tone of much British writing is such that it is hard for many to realize that by the last campaign in Germany the Anglo-Canadian forces formed less than a quarter of Eisenhower's command. Curiously, Americans tend to be even more ill-informed about the efforts of our fellow North Americans than about those of the British forces. One reason for this is undoubtedly the simple fact that, by the standards of the nato era, the American and Canadian armed forces had remarkably little to do with each other before and during World War ii. But the Canadians, on several occasions, carried . . .

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