Toward a Critical Politics of Teacher Thinking: Mapping the Postmodern

Toward a Critical Politics of Teacher Thinking: Mapping the Postmodern

Toward a Critical Politics of Teacher Thinking: Mapping the Postmodern

Toward a Critical Politics of Teacher Thinking: Mapping the Postmodern

Synopsis

This book calls for a new type of teacher education that empowers teachers to be self-directed professionals. The author believes that the current trend of teaching teachers to learn an empirical knowledge base which they then implement in their classrooms is demeaning to teachers and teaches them not to think. He cities the example, the emphasis on lesson plan format, the writing of behavioral objectives, and pre-packaged activities. One way to achieve thoughtful empowerment, the author suggests, is through critical action research, or teaching practitioner thinking.

Excerpt

Within the last decade the debate over defining the meaning and purpose of education has occupied the center of political and social life in the United States. Dominated largely by an aggressive and ongoing attempt by various sectors of the political Right, including "fundamentalists," nationalists, and political conservatives, the debate over educational policy has been organized around a set of values and practices that take as their paradigmatic model the laws and ideology of the marketplace and the imperatives of a newly emerging cultural traditionalism. In the first instance, schooling is being redefined through a corporate ideology which stresses the primacy of choice over community, competition over cooperation, and excellence over equity. At stake here is the imperative to organize public schooling around the related practices of competition, reprivatization, standardization, and individualism.

In the second instance, the New Right has waged a cultural war against schools as part of a wider attempt to contest the emergence of new public cultures and social movements that have begun to demand that schools take seriously the imperatives of living in a multiracial and multicultural democracy. The contours of this cultural offensive are evident in the call by the Right for standardized testing, the rejection of multiculturalism, and the development of curricula around what is called, euphemistically, a "common culture." In this perspective, the notion of a common culture serves as a referent to denounce any attempt by subordinate groups to challenge the narrow ideological and political parameters by which such a culture both defines and expresses itself. It is not too surprising that the . . .

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