Instructional Models in Reading

Instructional Models in Reading

Instructional Models in Reading

Instructional Models in Reading

Synopsis

This book started with a simple idea -- examine models of reading instruction that have emerged during the past 20 years. These models span a wide range of instruction representing a continuum from highly structured, task analytic instruction to child-centered and holistic instruction. Each model has its own epistemology or views on how "reading" and "instruction" are to be defined. The different epistemologies indicate different principles of instruction which, in turn, indicate different practices in the classroom. Each model is also supported by a different research base. In this volume, leading proponents of these different models discuss their ideas about reading instruction thereby encouraging readers to make their own comparisons and contrasts. The chapter authors seem to adopt the editors' eclectic approach--to some greater or lesser extent--incorporating aspects of other models into their instruction as they see other goals. Thus, models of reading instruction are complex. Complicating matters further is the fact that teachers hold their own models of reading, which may or may not be congruent with those discussed here. Although academically developed models influence college preservice and in-service instruction, teachers' own models of reading filter the information that they take from what they learn from these perspectives. By carefully examining these variables, this book makes a firm contribution toward disciplined inquiry into what it means to teach reading.

Excerpt

This volume started with a simple idea--to examine models of reading instruction that have emerged over the past 20 years or so. These models span a wide range of instruction representing a continuum from highly structured, task analytic instruction to child-centered and holistic instruction. Each model has its own epistemology or views on how "reading" and how "instruction" are to be defined. The different epistemologies indicate different principles of instruction, which, in turn, indicate different practices in the classroom. Each model is also supported by a different research base. Our goal in putting this book together was to get leading proponents of these different models to discuss their ideas about reading instruction and to assemble these discussions into one volume so that readers could make their own comparisons and contrasts.

We thought of these as models rather than approaches or methods in that they represented constructs of what the authors think "reading instruction" might be. The first appearance in writing of the word model occurred in Germany during the 16th century to denote an object replicated in the manufacture of a product. Model is a word whose sound and meaning were close to the Italian word modello, an object that stood before an artist for imitation or representation. The words model and modello derive ultimately from the Indo-European med meaning a measure or to measure or to take a measure. From med came the Latin modo, meaning form. The diminutive of modo, modello, served as an architectural term referring to one half the diameter of a column. Its meaning generalized first from modo, meaning . . .

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