John Sterling, a Representative Victorian

John Sterling, a Representative Victorian

John Sterling, a Representative Victorian

John Sterling, a Representative Victorian

Excerpt

This book concerns itself with the mind of John Sterling as characteristic of his time, with no pretensions to minute biographical completeness. Begun as a small project of Victorian research, it has been greatly enlarged through the generosity of Miss Frances M. Sterling, John Sterling's grand-daughter, who has allowed free access to her large store, carefully preserved, of John Sterling's unpublished letters, has contributed a photograph of the portrait in her possession of Sterling in 1830 painted by B. de la Cour, and permitted all possible use of Sterling material wherever found.

An unusual body of personal and biographical information on the theme has long existed in print, partly because of Sterling's wide acquaintance, partly because of the controversy once waged about his name and memory. The addition of new letters gives to his thought a singularly representative value.

Letters of Sterling have been already published in his two biographies, by Julius Hare and by Thomas Carlyle, in the Letters and Memorials ofRichard Chevenix Trench, in the Correspondence ofJohn Sterling and Ralph Waldo Emerson, in Mrs.Oliphant Annals of a Publishing House, in a separate little sheaf, Twelve Letters, written to his young cousin, William Coningham. They appear here and there singly: in Catherine Johnson's William Bodham Donne and his Friends, HallamTennyson

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