The Socializing Instincts: Individual, Family, and Social Bonds

The Socializing Instincts: Individual, Family, and Social Bonds

The Socializing Instincts: Individual, Family, and Social Bonds

The Socializing Instincts: Individual, Family, and Social Bonds

Synopsis

This work is an attempt to begin the process of closing the theoretical gap in our knowledge about ourselves, challenging the current thought on human development and behavior. A psychosocial/biological approach is used to explore the influence of instinct on human nature. Models to assess behavior and to develop individual and socially therapeutic interventions are proposed.

Excerpt

For what seemed an immensely long time I gazed without knowing, even without wishing to know, what it was that confronted me.

--Aldous Huxley, The Doors of Perception, 1954, p. 53.

Over the centuries, there have been many proposals put forward to explain human nature. These explications have been constructed by some of the greatest thinkers, philosophers, and metaphysicians in human history. We also have been influenced by not so great thinkers such as players of parlor games, astrologers, politicians, and purveyors of ideology. Their efforts have resulted in a number of remarkable interpretations that have both pushed forward and distorted the self- conceptualization of humanity. As a result, we know less about human development and behavior than we do about the development and behavior of dogs, cats, chimpanzees, and other animals.

In this book, I put forward another explanation of human nature. I will propose and present evidence that an explanation of human development and behavior based on a model taking into account the biological, psychological, and sociological aspects of human nature is more useful and produces a clearer understanding of human behavior than other models. Utilizing this approach, I will examine the implications of a connection between the influence of our innate needs and drives and our desire to socialize and bond with others. This need is found in our genetic codes and has been conveyed to present-day humans in the same way (albeit more complicated and to date less observed) than the . . .

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