Youthjobs: Toward a Private/Public Partnership

Youthjobs: Toward a Private/Public Partnership

Youthjobs: Toward a Private/Public Partnership

Youthjobs: Toward a Private/Public Partnership

Synopsis

"This book is a clear concise reminder that a strong job creation in the U. S. A. still leaves many youth unemployed and underemployed and that our society must do more and better in providing occupational training for 16 to 19 year olds for whom school is no real alternative." - Eli Ginzberg, Director, Conservation of Human Resources, Columbia University

Excerpt

There has never been a reasonable and working relationship in the United States between programs in education and programs in employment and job training. and there has never been a coherent agreed upon policy regarding how schools, job trainers and employers should relate to one another.

Educators have historically seen employers as interested in taking youngsters out of school before their full educational development. They have seen business's interest as exploitive and they have resisted the intrusion of business into the school curriculum. For many years, within the setting of the American high school -- save the vocational school -- business subjects were downgraded, and the connection between schools and jobs was ignored.

This defensive response, developed when jobs were plentiful, was in keeping with the American dream of a college education for all who could survive high school. Indeed, the students who left school before the word "drop out" had meaning found jobs in industrial America. Several things have, however, begun to emerge over the last several decades that have changed a great deal of this. As America has moved into the post-industrialized era, we have seen the nature of jobs change. Many of the newer jobs have begun to require better academic skills. the high school diploma has become a job requirement as virtually every employer now wants his potential worker to be better prepared in school. But while employers have insisted on a better prepared high school graduate, the quality of public schooling in America has declined dramatically. Scores confirm what employers know: too many high school graduates can't read or write, or do simple math. What has made all of this more crushing to the young people is that as the need for skills has increased, and their level of skills has decreased, jobs have become more . . .

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