Popular Culture, Schooling, and Everyday Life

Popular Culture, Schooling, and Everyday Life

Popular Culture, Schooling, and Everyday Life

Popular Culture, Schooling, and Everyday Life

Synopsis

Illuminating one of the most pervasive issues of our time, Popular Culture is the first book to link the importance and implications of popular culture with pedagogical practice. It shows how cultural forms such as Hollywood films, pop music, soap operas, and televangelism are organized by gender, age, class, race, and ethnicity, thus providing the contradictory text that both enables and disables emancipatory interest, so fundamental to the formation of self and society. What emerges is a redefinition of the very notion of popular culture.

Excerpt

Paulo Freire and Henry A. Giroux

◆ Like Klee's angel in the painting "Angelus Novus," modernity has faith in human agency even as it recognizes that the past was often built on human suffering. In the best Enlightenment tradition, reason offers the hope that men and women can address and change, when necessary, the world in which they live. The task of modernity, with its faith in reason and emancipation, is perhaps then to renew a sense of urgency in a postmodern world, the world where difference, contingency, and power increasingly challenge the boundaries of nationalism, sexism, racism, and class oppression.

In this world new challenges present themselves not only to educators but to everyone for whom contingency and loss of certainty do not necessarily mean the Inevitable triumph of nihilism and despair but rather a state of possibility in which destiny and hope can be snatched from the weakening grasp of the totalitarianism exhibited by nation-states on both the Left and the Right. In this world that no longer has firm boundaries, not only is reason in crisis, at the same time pedagogical and Ideological conditions exist for fashioning forms of struggle defined in a radically different conception of politics. For educators this is as much a pedagogical issue as it is a political one. At best, it points to the Importance of rewriting the relationship among knowledge, power, and desire. It points as well to the necessity of redefining the importance of difference while at the same time seeking articulations among subordinate groups and historically privileged groups committed to . . .

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