Readings in Greek History, from Homer to the Battle of Chaeronea

Readings in Greek History, from Homer to the Battle of Chaeronea

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Readings in Greek History, from Homer to the Battle of Chaeronea

Readings in Greek History, from Homer to the Battle of Chaeronea

Read FREE!

Excerpt

Happily the time has gone by when it is necessary to make an apology for introducing source books in history. The use of such material in the secondary schools is more or less generally accepted and tends to become the rule rather than the exception.

The material in this book which has hitherto been unavailable to the English reader consists chiefly of selections from the orators, especially Lysias and Andocides, and inscriptions. No effort has been made to present a continuous narrative.

The dramatists have been used when the direct bearing on history is evident; the same is true of the lyric and elegiac poets. It is tempting to include more excerpts of a purely literary or philosophical character, for they reflect the thought of the time as truly as the historians; but it is no easy task to draw the line, and the suggestion now and then of how the Greek spirit expressed itself in forms other than prose narrative is all that has been possible. Pausanias has been frequently used. His description of Greece brings many scenes vividly before us, and his interest in myths and old legends has preserved many traditions of remote antiquity.

It seemed very desirable to include a fairly large number of inscriptions. The average student knows vaguely in a general way that these form one of the most important classes of sources, but he seldom or never sees either an inscription or any book about inscriptions which will be of use without a reading knowledge of Greek. Those included have been chosen from Hicks and Hill "Greek Historical Inscriptions" in the hope that the student might become acquainted with the phraseology and subject matter of certain kinds of historical records. The use of inscriptions by those unfamiliar with Greek will always be limited and to a certain extent . . .

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