A Hook in Leviathan: A Critical Interpretation of the Hoover Commission Report

A Hook in Leviathan: A Critical Interpretation of the Hoover Commission Report

A Hook in Leviathan: A Critical Interpretation of the Hoover Commission Report

A Hook in Leviathan: A Critical Interpretation of the Hoover Commission Report

Excerpt

This book describes the biggest fish in the world and is written for the benefit of 150,000,000 little fishes.

The monster is the leviathan Government of the United States, now operating at an annual cost of more than $43 billions, which is several billions more than its Treasury can supply. Most of the minnows are the citizens whose taxes provide what actually is in the Treasury and who are further obliged to cash the Government's drafts for the remainder. The other minnows are yet unborn and will be presented with some of these drafts at their first gasp.

In these pages many excellent suggestions are made with a view to slimming and energizing the monster and otherwise improving his performance as protector of the little native fish, and as policeman of the troubled waters of the world. If only the more important of these suggestions are transformed into vigorous public opinion, Congress and the President will take heed.

The way to attain this opinion is to get this book read by a very great number of people. For that reason an attempt has been made to describe the problems, their details, and their solutions in popular terms, and in this the authors have succeeded. All responsible householders recognize the necessity of periodically checking income against outgo, and trying to get more for less, or better for as much. But few realize that the condition of government in the United States is an integral part of that effort. Reading this book will make that clearer than I have ever seen it made.

The authors have managed also to brief without damage the two million words in the reports of the Commission on Organization of the Executive Branch of the Government, headed by former President Hoover. Sir James Frazer and Arnold Toynbee, in condensing their own famous works, have had a more scholarly but not a more arduous task. The discussion of the Hoover Commission reports that follow also preserves the nonpartisan approach and flavor of those documents.

But, having achieved this, the authors have gone on to note exceptions to Commission proposals and make alternative proposals . . .

Author Advanced search

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.