The Good Years: from 1900 to the First World War

The Good Years: from 1900 to the First World War

The Good Years: from 1900 to the First World War

The Good Years: from 1900 to the First World War

Excerpt

"A new day has dawned. Civilization will never loose its hold on Shanghai . . . the gates of Peking will never again be closed against the methods of modern man."

--SENATOR ALBERT J. BEVERIDGE

On the morning of April 1, 1900, six of the Americans to whom civilization was committed lay fogbound on the China Sea. Mrs. Edwin H. Conger, wife of the American minister at Peking, was returning from a visit to the States; with her she brought her daughter Laura and four other ladies whom she wanted to show the wonderful things being done for China.

Naturally the fog was exasperating. The more so since Mrs. Conger --by now rather used to diplomatic prerogatives--could do nothing to hurry along the little Japanese steamer Negato . "I have to watch myself," she confided to her diary. "The Captain is running this ship and I must hands off."

Her patience was rewarded. The fog lifted, and on April 3 the Negato dropped anchor off Tientsin. Handkerchiefs fluttered as an official launch bobbed alongside. Aboard was Minister Conger himself --GOP wheelhorse . . . Civil War veteran . . . close friend of President McKinley.

Ashore the ladies were whisked to the legation's special train, and . . .

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