The Life of Robert Louis Stevenson - Vol. 2

The Life of Robert Louis Stevenson - Vol. 2

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The Life of Robert Louis Stevenson - Vol. 2

The Life of Robert Louis Stevenson - Vol. 2

Read FREE!

Excerpt

"But, indeed, I think we all belong to many countries. I am a
Scotchman, touch me and you will find the thistle; I am a Briton, and
live and move and have my being in the greatness of our national
achievements; but am I to forget the long hospitality of that beautiful
and kind country, France? Or has not America done me favours to
confound my gratitude? Nay, they are all my relatives; I love them all
dearly; and should they fall out among themselves (which God in his
mercy forbid!), I believe I should be driven mad with their conflicting
claims upon my heart." -- R. L. S., MS. of The Silverado Squatters .

THE chief link which bound Stevenson to this country was now broken, for his mother was free to follow him and his wife to whatever climate the advice of the doctors might send him. Year after year the struggle with ill-health was becoming more painful; "an enemy who was exciting at first, but has now, by the iteration of his strokes, become merely annoying and inexpressibly irksome." He seemed condemned to a life in the sick-room, and even there to be steadily losing ground. Under the altered circumstances, his uncle, Dr. George Balfour, peremptorily insisted on a complete change of climate for a year, suggesting a trial of either one of the Indian hill-stations or Colorado; this advice was reinforced by his Bournemouth physician, Dr. Scott, and for several obvious reasons America was preferred. As soon as his mother's promise to accompany the party was obtained, Skerryvore was let, and by the middle of July their tickets were taken for New York.

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