In Search of New Organizational Paradigms

In Search of New Organizational Paradigms

In Search of New Organizational Paradigms

In Search of New Organizational Paradigms

Synopsis

Preface Acknowledgments Introduction Organizations Challenged by Leisure "Rational" Versus "Natural" Model Facing Social Conflicts in Organizations Utopia or a Historical Necessity? Toward a Participatory Model Dialectics of Organizations Implementation of Participatory Management Index

Excerpt

I have prepared this book hoping to stimulate interest in the alternate organizational forms to bureaucracy. in 1948 I was graduated from the special socioeconomic program on cooperation at Jagiellonian University in Cracow (Poland) and became involved for a few months in one of the most fascinating projects of my life: the self-governing structure of the biggest workers' co-op of that time in Poland. Our task was to organize the longshoremen into autonomous units run by themselves and which constituted the foundation of the cooperative enterprise specializing in unloading ships. the project did not last long because the fast-progressing bureaucratization of the Polish economy of that transitory time inspired the government to close the co-op and move the whole business to the jurisdiction of the state (a much more expensive and less efficient solution). Much later on in my busy professional life, I moved from one country to another but was persistently anxious to pursue my original interest in alternative organizations. I owe in this respect the original inspiration to Jan Wolski, a distinguished promoter of producer cooperation in Poland who had the courage and imagination to oppose state socialism of the Soviet style.

This book summarizes my readings, experiences, and personal insights into the field of participatory management. Today we already have a rich literature devoted to industrial democracy, but I want to take a little different perspective than usual. Instead of emphasizing what is convenient and expedient, I am starting in the Introduction with meaning and values. the painful process of self-discovery and the search for excellence seem to me the basic organizational factors. Any participation makes sense only when people afford themselves the chance to grow as persons and are conscious of the far-reaching moral consequences of organizational involvement. of course, this has a good deal to do with understanding leisure and, therefore, in Chapter 1 I pay attention to the problems of "having fun" in the modern organizational society. I see the current orientation to leisure as a major organizational challenge that has to be faced by management. Alternative forms of organization make deeper sense and may be of lasting value only in close relation to the civilizational confrontations of our times. Forms in which people work and play may help to promote or to undermine the human . . .

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