The Unfinished Revolution in China

The Unfinished Revolution in China

The Unfinished Revolution in China

The Unfinished Revolution in China

Excerpt

JAPAN HAD NO SOONER SURRENDERED THAN STRANGE THINGS BEGAN to happen in Eastern Asia.

British and Dutch troops landing to "liberate" Java did not disarm conquered enemy units but ordered them to co-operate in subduing the local population, which had formed a government to rule itself. It was only when the Indonesians stood up and fought that the British stopped shooting for a while and tried talking.

French forces in Indo-China, again with British support, employed Japanese soldiers against the independent Viet Nam government.

The British in Malaya allowed the Japanese garrisons to keep a considerable part of their arms for "self-defense" and began to hunt down the wartime anti-Japanese guerillas there. In Burma friction developed between local antifascist forces and the victorious Allies.

In the Philippines, General MacArthur disarmed and deported the Japanese. But he became the protector of Filipino landlords, commercial magnates and politicians who had been Japan's quislings during the occupation. American troops collaborated with these forces in expeditions against the Hukbalahap, the Filipino peasant Maquis which had battled the enemy and divided the estates of traitors among the tenants.

In China, Chiang Kai-shek threatened dire penalties to any Japanese who surrendered to the guerilla armies which had fought them for eight years in technically occupied territory. He hastily legalized former puppet forces and officials there so that the Chi-

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