England Expects Every American to Do His Duty

England Expects Every American to Do His Duty

England Expects Every American to Do His Duty

England Expects Every American to Do His Duty

Excerpt

Anyone who has taken the time to read the title of this book from beginning to end has at least one question to ask. What is meant by England? Does it refer to "this sceptred isle" of which Shakespeare wrote, or to its inhabitants? Does it mean the official government of the country, or is it just another editorial abstraction?

As used interchangeably throughout this book the words England and Britain have just one meaning. And because what they describe has no parallel in any other nation, they require a short explanation at the outset. Every country consists of a small minority that devotes itself to the business of government and a large majority that has little or no concern with affairs of state. Furthermore, every enterprise within each individual country consists of a small minority that occupies positions of power and a large majority that does not take an active day-to-day part in formulating policy. This is not to say that always and everywhere the minority rules and the majority obeys. Those in power must always take account of the needs and wishes of the rest of the people who, in turn, will occasionally replace one set of rulers with another.

Different times and different places create different circumstances, and the past twenty years have seen . . .

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