On Romanticism in Slavic Literature

On Romanticism in Slavic Literature

On Romanticism in Slavic Literature

On Romanticism in Slavic Literature

Excerpt

It is not difficult to notice that all Russian poem devoted to waterfalls and mountain streams display a considerable unity of vocabulary. However, the repetition of words and of images connected with them divides the vocabulary of waterfall poems into two groups. To the first belong visual, coloristic designations: diamonds- almazy (or almaznyj) in Deržavin, Kapnist, BestuževMarlinskij; pearls-žemčug in Deržavin, Kapnist, Vjazemskij, N. Bobriščev-Puškin, Glinka; other precious stones in Deržavin, Kapnist, Marlinskij; silver-serebro in Deržavin, Glinka, Poželaev; rainbow-raduga in Kapnist and Bestužev-Marlinskij. Other poets pay no attention to bright colors--which are undoubtedly really the most characteristic feature of the waterfall image. In certain poets we find non-coloristic visual images: foam- pena , smoke- dym , cloud- oblako (i.e., little splashes of water).

On the other hand, the poets almost without exception mention the "roar", "thunder", "howl" (rev, grom, voj) of waterfalls and mountain torrents. In particular, Deržavin's address to the waterfall: "Sound, sound" (Šumi, šumi) is repeated by Boratynskij, Poležaev, and V. Raevskij, varied in Marlinskij's address to the Šebutuj: "Groan, sound" (Stenaj, šumi), and simplified be Kjuchel'- beker to " Sound, Argun '" (Šumi že, o Argun'). We meet different appeals to the waterfall in Vjazemskij: "Rush with implacable anger" (Nesis's neukrotimym gnevom) and Glinka: "Kivač! Kivač!

. . . Answer . . ." (Kivač Kivač! . . . Otvetstvuj . . .).

In the Russian romantic poets we find a whole complex of words, known to us from Russian romantic poetry and connected . . .

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