Mr. Lincoln's Navy

Mr. Lincoln's Navy

Mr. Lincoln's Navy

Mr. Lincoln's Navy

Excerpt

WHEN ABRAHAM LINCOLN WAS ELECTED PRESIdent on November 6, 1860, the House Divided began to fall apart. The standardbearer of the "Black Republican" Party had himself announced his belief that the nation "could not long survive half slave, half free." In the view of Southern extremists his election itself marked the beginning of the war.

South Carolina separatists, three thousand strong in Charleston's Secession Hall, passed an ordinance declaring "that the Union now subsisting between South Carolina and other States under the name of the United States of America is hereby dissolved." The fateful day was Wednesday, December 20, 1860--three months before Lincoln took the oath of office, four months before Fort Sumter.

Governor Pickens of South Carolina at once sent representatives to Washington to negotiate with President James Buchanan's government for the peaceful surrender to South Carolina of all Federal forts, arsenals, customhouses, and lighthouses within its boundaries.

The secession of South Carolina was celebrated at Mobile by the firing of a hundred guns and a military parade. Church bells were rung and citizens in the streets made fiery Secessionist speeches. Alabama passed the Ordinance of Secession. At New Orleans a hundred guns were touched off and the pelican flag of the state was unfurled. Marching Creoles sang the French revolutionary "La Marseillaise," and a bust of John C. Calhoun, patron saint of Secession, was exhibited . . .

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