The Common People of Ancient Rome: Studies of Roman Life and Literature

The Common People of Ancient Rome: Studies of Roman Life and Literature

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The Common People of Ancient Rome: Studies of Roman Life and Literature

The Common People of Ancient Rome: Studies of Roman Life and Literature

Read FREE!

Excerpt

How the armies of Rome mastered the nations of the world is known to every reader of history, but the story of the conquest by Latin of the languages of the world is vague in the minds of most of us. If we should ask ourselves how it came about, we should probably think of the world-wide supremacy of Latin as a natural result of the world-wide supremacy of the Roman legions or of Roman law. But in making this assumption we should be shutting our eyes to the history of our own times. A conquered people does not necessarily accept, perhaps it has not commonly accepted, the tongue of its master. In his "Ancient and Modern Imperialism" Lord Cromer states that in India only one hundred people in every ten thousand can read and write English, and this condition exists after an occupation of one hundred and fifty years or more. He adds: "There does . . .

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