Faith and Prejudice: Intergroup Problems in Protestant Curricula

Faith and Prejudice: Intergroup Problems in Protestant Curricula

Faith and Prejudice: Intergroup Problems in Protestant Curricula

Faith and Prejudice: Intergroup Problems in Protestant Curricula

Excerpt

This book is a Protestant self-study of church school teachings in the complicated and delicate area of intergroup relations. By analyzing current official lesson materials, it describes and evaluates how four representative Protestant groups portray other racial, ethnic, and--more particularly--religious communities. The following pages provide answers to certain fundamental questions. Is any prejudice, implicit as well as explicit, found in Protestant curricula? What images of other groups, especially religious ones, are provided teachers and pupils? How do Protestants see themselves vis-à-vis the other faiths with which they compete in the free market of a pluralistic culture? Do significant differences exist within Protestantism itself in depicting those who live outside it? If so, what are the relationships between the diverse theological orientations of modern Protestants and the kinds of problems they encounter in teaching about non-Protestants? Finally, at what points, if any, do the deep commitments of the various versions of the Protestant faith promote or impede wholesome intergroup relations?

These questions spring partly from the desire of the Protestant community to continually re-examine its own life, in keeping with its vigorous slogan of self-criticism, "The church must be free to reform itself!" But they also stem from a realization that Jews, Catholics, Negroes, and others are genuinely apprehensive about the attitudes of outsiders toward them. These anxieties are not entirely groundless. If the Protestant legacy of freedom and toleration is impressive, it is also tragically stained. This mixed legacy is not entirely a matter of past history. In the battle for religious liberty from the days of the Reformers to the present, two forces have contended for supremacy--an emerging commitment to freedom of conscience, and a tendency to punish dissent. Not even the democratic ethos of Protestantism in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries was sufficient to check the tide of the "Know-Nothing . . ."

Author Advanced search

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.