Congress, Its Contemporary Role

Congress, Its Contemporary Role

Congress, Its Contemporary Role

Congress, Its Contemporary Role

Excerpt

During many years of close association with Congress I came increasingly to be impressed with the gulf between the popular picture of our national legislative body and its reality. Nor had the insights presented in academic circles seemed to me by any means wholly accurate. Consequently, when New York University honored me with the invitation to give the Stokes Lectures on Politics and to make Congress the subject of these lectures, it came almost as a command. The approach which the University suggested did not call for a description of the minutiae of congressional organization and procedure, still less for a repetition of the detailed criticism that has been so frequently leveled at Congress in many of its aspects. Rather it pointed toward an analysis of Congress under the Constitution, of its place in the governmental setting, of the way in which it is responding to a changing age. It is in this frame of reference that the lectures have been written.

In the preparation, I have had the invaluable assistance and advice of many. Three of my colleagues in the Legislative Reference, Service, Hugh L. Elsbree, George B. Galloway, and Meyer Jacobstein, have read the draft in its entirety. Three other colleagues, Edward S. Corwin, Halford L. Hoskins, and Howard S. Piquet, have read certain portions and offered helpful suggestions thereon. Within Congress itself, I would like especially to thank Senator Joseph O'Mahoney and Representatives James Dolliver and Sam Hobbs for their courtesy and counsel in connection with certain of the chapters. WallaceMcClure . . .

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