An Outline of Modern Russian Historiography

An Outline of Modern Russian Historiography

An Outline of Modern Russian Historiography

An Outline of Modern Russian Historiography

Excerpt

Few fields of historiography are more interesting than the Russian and very few are as stimulating. Whether one follows it in the ponderous tomes of Ikonnikov, or in the keen observations of Milyukov, the philosophical analyses of Karyeyev, or the latest Marxist criticisms against Pokrovsky, he is fascinated by the vistas which lead to an understanding of Russia and her historians. In no other national field of historical endeavor is it as vital to see historiography in perspective. Here, without a guide, the student is lost. How Russians wrote history, what philosophical views, foreign and domestic, influenced them, what objectives the schools of Russian historians evolved, and what they accomplished, from Tatishchev to Pokrovsky, from the first national historian to the court historian of the Bolsheviks--all these are essential. What names pass by in review! Karamzin, Kostomarov, Solovyev, Klyuchevsky, Hrushevsky, Platonov, Milyukov, Pokrovsky! From national glorification to national degradation--from the minutest research to wide-sweeping horizons! Perhaps no other nation has a historiography so rich, so varied, so vital, so revealing. It is a legacy of hope and pathos.

To survey this field with reasonable insight and balance is no mean task. To give it some organization and to sketch its main lines of development requires a broad and discerning use of a wide variety of sources besides the writings of the historians themselves. In devoting himself to this task, Dr. Anatole G. Mazour has rendered not only to Anglo-Saxon students, but to Russians as well, a valuable service.

ROBERT J. KERNER

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.